Drawings from Provincetown

PTown deck umbrellaSit in one place for a while every day, for a few days, and draw the same things.

PTown deck 1

PTown deck 2

PTown deck 3b


Ptown railings and sea ptown rocks and water 1 ptown rocks and water 2

Provincetown, October 15-18, 2014.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Interview by Pedro Moura

Portugese comics scholar Pedro Moura did an interview with me and Alexander Danner about Comics: a Global History, for the Comics Alternative website.  Pedro wrote a review too, for his Portugese blog (Google translate will give you a rough idea of what it says, if you ask nicely!)

 

Posted in Comics: A Global History, reviews | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Three Anthologies

I have a story in each of three anthologies making their debut at MICE this year (well one is making its New England debut, the other two are totally legit).

In SubCultures, you will find Esperantists, a non-fiction piece about Esperanto speakers (especially native Esperanto speakers).  For this story I interviewd 5 Esperanto speakers and intercut their stories, along with a little history, and some Esperanto Fun Facts.

esperanto 1

 

Colonial Comics, vol. 1 will contain Captives: the story of Eunice and John Williams. Much on this site about that one already.

p1 jpg

 

Last but not least, in Hellbound V: the End, I have A History of the Hollywood Musical.  It’s a horror anthology, and my story is certainly off-kilter with the genre. I guess it’s a sort of a Twlight Zone-ish story.  Kind of.  Except with a dog.  I already posted page one, so here’s page two:AHOHM 2 jpgI’ll be at table D11 at MICE, by the way: that’s table 11 in Doucet Hall, named for guess who?  And look at this wonderful map by Shelli Paroline! miceMap2014

 

Posted in My Comics, News | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Reading on the Wall…and more MICE news!

fb logo B reduced

 

The MICE festivities kick off with an art show reception this Friday!  Come join us… snacks and wine and some great original comic art by Boston-area (mostly) cartoonists and  MICE exhibitors.  Click here for a list of all the artists.

Join the Facebook Event for the opening!

 

Next weekend, same space: MICE itself!  The Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo, Saturday Oct 4, 10-6, Sunday Oct 5, 11-4.  Lots of comics, panels, workshops — free and family-friendly.

And on Sunday October 5th, as a special part of MICE, Comics and the Classroom, a half-day symposium for educators — free of charge and open to all.  More info here. 

Join the Facebook event for the symposium.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

A new comic, “A History of the Hollywood Musical”

This is my submission for Hellbound 5: The End.  No, it’s not really a history of the Hollywood musical.  Or maybe, yes it is.  Kind of.   Here’s a preview of page one:

AHOAMC 1 color

Posted in My Comics | Tagged | Leave a comment

SubCultures Anthology

As a publisher (of Ninth Art Press), I’m very excited about this project: the SubCultures Anthology.

CoverSUbCult2RGB

The cover of the book – by Box Brown

It was conceived and edited by Whit Taylor, and she has put together an outstanding collection of stories, by 36 different creators, about various subcultures.  I’m not only the publisher, I’m a contributor, with a story about Esperanto speakers (focusing on native Esperanto speakers); I’ll  post some more about my contribution soon. Meantime, to se lots of previews and to pre-order the book (it will be physically available in early September), go here.

 

Posted in News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Comics: A Global History, reviewed

admin-ajax.php

The book is reviewed on The Comics Bulletin website:

“in Comics: A Global History, 1968 to the Present, [Mazur and Danner] do an admirable job with a nearly impossible task: providing an encyclopedic overview of important comics throughout the world during that era – popular comics and alternative comics, comics from Japan, Europe and the United States, comics from different schools of thought and design, comics using diverse styles, comics presented sometimes in dramatically diverse ways – and Mazur and Danner do so with a smart focus.”

Posted in Comics: A Global History, News, reviews | Tagged | Leave a comment

Comics Global History: Nakazawa Shigeo, Shōjo Club 1956

I continue my sporadic exploration of old shoujo manga through obscure (to me, anyway) books obtained through Yahoo Japan auctions.  I got my hands on this Shōjo Club “supplement” from 1956.  It’s a tiny paperback (4′ by 6″), poorly stapled (I basically had to pull the thing apart to get usable scans, which I hate to do).  That contains a single long story, Yukimura izumi chan monogatari  (Yukimura Izumi’s Story).Shojo Club 1956 coverShojo Club 56 -splash 1

The artist is Nakazawa Shigeo (中沢しげお).  I assume artist-writer, since there’s only one name credited.  I don’t know anything about him, but there is some quite nice work here, with that introspective shōjo mood (see my previous post).

Shojo Cub 56  9-17Shojo Cub 56 -70-73

I like the heavy line around the characters, and the nicely detailed settings, with various textures.  Also, I would say it’s a pretty sophisticated use of “camera angles,” for a kids’ comic from the mid-50s.

Also, notice that they were still numbering the individual panels at this point.

Shojo Cub 56 18

Shojo Cub 28And I love the panel with Izumi’s reflection in the teacup as she’s thinking!

 

Posted in Comics: A Global History | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Comics, a Global History: Pilote, the Early Years

Uderzo - ASTERIX -le combat des chefs - p46 1966 DETAILComing in June from publisher Thames and Hudson, “Comics: A Global History, 1968 to the Present,” written by Alexander Danner and me.    Here are some excerpts and expanded material, including some great images that couldn’t fit in the book.Text in italics is directly from the book.

The decision to start the book in 1968, to define it as a sort of “comics come of age” narrative, sprung from the idea of “watershed” events like the appearance of Zap in the U.S., of Tsuge’s Nejishiki (Screw Style) in Japan, and, in Europe, and the changes seen in the pages of Pilote all taking place in that same year. In all these cases, of course, the breakthroughs of ’68 had been brewing throughout the earlier years of the decade.  As it says in the introduction…

 In Europe, the maturing of the comics audience was accompanied by a rebalancing of the creative center from Belgium toward France. This began with the establishment in 1959 of the Paris-based Pilote magazine by writers René Goscinny and Jean-Michel Charlier, and artist Albert Uderzo. Like Tintin or Spirou, Pilote was initially aimed at schoolboy readers and had a distinctly wholesome and pedagogical tone. But Goscinny, who became editor-in-chief, envisioned a more adult tone for bande dessinée, and Pilote began to move in that direction, helped by the popularity of Uderzo and Goscinny’s Astérix le Gaulois (Astérix the Gaul, 1959) and Charlier and Jean Giraud’s Lieutenant Blueberry (1963). Astérix, which was set in France during the period of Roman occupation, offered sly, anachronistic satire of contemporary culture, while Blueberry was a western with revisionist, antiauthoritarian undertones.

This Norman Rockwell hommage (or is it a parody) encapsulates the position of the early Pilote perfectly: still depicted in a classical mode, young French children gazing at the rebellious future as symbolized by French rock star Johnny Hallyday.

This Norman Rockwell hommage (or is it a parody) encapsulates the position of the early Pilote perfectly: still depicted in a classical mode, young French children gazing at the (mildly) rebellious future as symbolized by French rock star Johnny Hallyday.

Cabu - cover, Pilote 179, 1963. Cabu's insouciant teenage character "Le Grand Duduche," is another indicator of Pilote's trajectory toward youth culture and unconventional graphic styles.

Cabu – cover, Pilote 179, 1963. Cabu’s insouciant teenage character “Le Grand Duduche,” is another indicator of Pilote’s trajectory toward youth culture and unconventional graphic styles.

In its first few years, Pilote’s content was only subtly different from that of  Spirou and Tintin.  Though the tone was perhaps a bit breezier, Pilote, like its Belgian elders, featured articles on current events, sports, pop culture and exotic cultures.

From March 1963, "Les Jeudis de Pilote," a feature that included letters to the editor, articles on sports and pop music, and a contest for readers to send in photos of themselves resembling celebrities like Charlie Chaplin or the Prince of Wales (below)

From March 1963, “Les Jeudis de Pilote,” a feature that included letters to the editor, articles on sports and pop music, and a contest for readers to send in photos of friends who were “sosies” (lookalikes) for celebrities like Sir Edmund Hillary, Charlie Chaplin, Ian Fleming or the Prince of Wales (below)

les jeudis de pilite 28-3-63 DETAIL

For the most part, the bandes dessinées found in early Pilotes are also in the Spirou/Tintin mold, with a mix of humor and action/drama:

Martial - "Jerome Buff, homme a toute faire" (Jerome Buff, Handyman), March 1963

Martial – “Jérôme Bluff, homme à toute faire” (Jerome Buff, Handyman), March 1963

 

Charlier & Poivet, "Allo DMA" June, 1962

Poivet, “Allo DMA” June, 1962

What soon set Pilote apart, and what set it on course to surpass its Belgian rivals, was the strip by founders Goscinny and Uderzo.  Like any other strip in the journal, Asterix was serialized one page per week:

Goscinny & Uderzo, Asterix, September 1962

Goscinny & Uderzo, Asterix, September 1962

Asterix’ combination of slapstick comedy and anachronistic satire were two of the elements that made it a sensation:

Goscinny & Uderzo, Asterix et le combat des chefs, 1966

Goscinny & Uderzo, Asterix et le combat des chefs, 1964

Uderzo - ASTERIX - Chez Les Bretons p19 1966 DETAILBeatles

Giscinny & Uderzo – Asterix chez les Bretons, 1965

The second pillar of Pilote’s success came in 1965 with Lieutenant Blueberry, written by Charlier and drawn by newcomer Jean Giraud.  In its early years, Giraud’s art for Blueberry was often stiff and undistinguished when compared with other Franco-Belgian westerns:

Giraud & Charlier, Fort Navajo 1965; page four  of the first Blueberry story.

Giraud & Charlier, Fort Navajo 1965; page four of the first Blueberry story.

Fronval , "Jeff Stevens" from Pilote, 1962

Fronval , “Jeff Stevens” from Pilote, 1962

From the start however, Charlier and Giraud brought a refreshing, contemporary rebelliousness to the protagonist of their strip, a quality reinforced by Giraud’s depiction of Blueberry as a sosie for New Wave film star Jean-Paul Belmondo.

blueberry belmondo 2

 

Within a few years, though, Giraud’s style would progress astonishingly, just one of the many major developments that Pilote would undergo during the eventful late ’60s-early ’70s period.

Giraud - General Tete Jaune p43 1971

Giraud - General Tete Jaune p8 1971 Giraud - General Tete Jaune p39 1971

(Above: Giraud & Charlier, 3 pages from Le Général Tête Jaune, 1968)

COMING SOON: “Pilote ’68!”

Posted in Comics: A Global History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Eunice Williams – coloring


Eunice Williams 2 color work bottom tier flat RGB

Currently coloring my story for the Jason Rodriguez’s Colonial Comics anthology.  This is page 2, panel 6.   Still working on it.

 

Posted in My Comics | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment